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Full text of "Linguistic Survey Of India Vol Ii Mon Khmer Siamese Chinese Families"

Til GROUP.

As already several times stated* ihom is an oxtinct laiiq;uai?f\ If is reported that
about a nundred people in the Sibsagar District of Assam can speak il (much as Pandits
can speak Sanskritj, but that iUs not their vernacular. It, is very doubtful if there are
now so many. A full account of the Ahoms is sriypn in the f»ei3f>ral introduction to this
group of languages. See pp. 61 and fl.

The following grammatical sketch and vocabulary are based on the specimens
attached, and their accuracy depends on the care with nhich the latter have been pre-
pared. This task was performed by Babu Goiab Chandra Baraa, formerly the Ihom
translator to the Assam Government, who is, T suppose, the only person alive who is
familiar with both ihom and English. The accuracy of the translation of the specimens is
guaranteed by the inexhaustible kindness of Mr, E. A. Gait, I.C.S., who has gone through
it with Babu Golab Chundra Barua, and has not only checked the meaning of every
syllable of this monosyllabic language, but, has also supplied me with a valuable series of
notes elucidating the many difficult points. I trust, therefore, that, in their main lines,
the grammar and vocabulary annexed will be found to be accurate. I have departed
from ray usual custom in providing a vocabulary. It seemed to me advisable to do this
on account of the little that is known regarding this interesting language.

Alphabet—The Ahom alphabet is an old form of that which, under various forms,
is current for Khamti, Shan, Burmese, and Chakma. It is more complete than those of
Ehamti and Shan, but not so complete as those of Burmese and Chakma. It is to be
ultimately referred to the alphabet in which Pali was written.

The Ahom alphabet consists of forty-one letters, of which eighteen are vowels and
twenty-three are consonants. They are given in the following table, together with the
corresponding Khamti letters for the sake of comparison.

Yowels.


	Ihom
	KUmti
	Power,

1
	tf
	i^^
	a.  In Ahom only used as a fulcrum for oth^r rowels.

2
	W\   ^
	^...SL-^
	a.

3
 4
	i/n
 JT| L
 *?
	•n -P
	$, e (as m met}

5
	wf
	SI
	..

6
	w
	*\
	*•

.»
	4
	i
	£,